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IJGMS (v1:n4)

Volume 1, Number 4


CONTENTS

An exploratory analysis of it training on business value - an evaluation of web infrastructure. Hackney, Soto-Acosta, & Colomo-Palacios.
Cultural Influences on the Decision Process for Acquiring Enterprise Software: A Comparison of Mexico and United States. Verville, Palanisamy, & Bernadas.
A View Based On Organizational Size: How Competitive Advantage Moderates The Learning Orientation/Business Performance Relationship. Martinette & Obenchain-Leeson.
Building Global Brand Equity through Advertising: Developing A Conceptual Framework Of Managing Global Brand Equity. Arora, Raisinghani, Arora, &Kothari.


ABSTRACTS


An exploratory analysis of it training on business value - an evaluation of web infrastructure
Ray Hackney

Brunel University Business School
Brunel University, UK
ray.hackney@gmail.com
Pedro Soto-Acosta
Department of Management and Finance
University of Murcia, Spain,
psoto@um.es
Ricardo Colomo-Palacios
Computer Science Department
Universidad Carlos III, Spain
ricardo.colomo@uc3m.es



Abstract

The paper evaluates the extent of Information Technology (IT) business value creation within individual organisations operating in Spain. It assesses, from a resource-based perspective, the effect of tangible and intangible IT resources (Web infrastructure and IT training) on improvements in business processes. This is considered through the subsequent interaction between business perspectives and electronic sources. The methodology involved a data source from Watch survey 2005, which is an initiative launched by the European Commission for monitoring the adoption of IT and business activity. Interviews were also undertaken with decision-makers in enterprises through respondents responsible for IT. The results demonstrate that, as hypothesized, Web infrastructure is not positively associated with business value and that specific training does however have a positive and significant impact.
Keywords: Information technology, IT training, resource-based theory, business value

Cultural Influences on the Decision Process for Acquiring Enterprise Software: A Comparison of Mexico and United States Jacques Verville
Faculty of Management, University of British Columbia - Okanagan,
Kelowna, Canada
jacques.verville@ubc.ca
Ramaraj Palanisamy
Gerald Schwartz School of Business & Information Systems,
St. Francis Xavier University, Antogonish, Canada
rpalanis@stfx.ca
Christine Bernadas
College of Education & Professional Studies, Central Washington University,
Ellensburg, Washington, DC
BernadaC@cwu.edu

Abstract

The acquisition of Enterprise Software (ES) is a high expenditure activity that is fraught with a high level of risk. Can we safely assume that the acquisition of ES is similar for all countries? A simple answer is that it is probably not due to fact that human beings are involved in the decision making process of acquiring ES, individuals from different cultural backgrounds may introduce their own cultural bias. The objective of this study is to answer the following question: in ES acquisition, are Mexican and US organizations influenced by the same factors? To answer the question a hybrid Structured Equation Modeling (SEM) study has been realized and confirmed by an ANOVA analysis. The results show that Mexican and U.S. firms are not influenced the same way or by the same influencing factors. "System", "Integration" and "Team" factors influence Mexican organizations more than US organizations and "Users" factor influences US organizations more than Mexican organizations.

Keywords: Enterprise software, United States, Mexico, ERP acquisition, Influences, factors and culture.


A View Based On Organizational Size: How Competitive Advantage Moderates The Learning Orientation/Business Performance Relationship
Louis A. Martinette

University of Mary Washington
121 University Boulevard
Fredericksburg, VA 22406-7239
lmartine@umw.edu
Alice Obenchain-Leeson
Averett University
420 West Main Street
Danville, VA 24541
aliceo@averett.edu

Abstract

The proposed study examines the influence of learning orientation on business performance (the achievement of sales and profit objectives) in the context of organization size. The primary constructs of this study, learning orientation, competitive advantage and business performance all relate, in some way, to an organization's ability to be responsive to customers and competitors. Lawler (1997) reminds readers that an organization's ability to do such is tightly related to size. The conceptual framework used in this research has been drawn from marketing, finance, and organizational behavior theory. Specifically, relationships related to learning orientation, sources of competitive advantage, and business performance have been identified. This research develops the theories of learning orientation (the core theory of this paper), competitive advantage, and identifies key business performance measures to examine some research questions - Is there a relationship between learning orientation and business performance-the achievement of sales and profit objectives in a) small organizations, and b) large organizations? Is there a statistically significant difference in the relationship between learning orientation and business performance among small organizations and large organizations? Is there a relationship between learning orientation and competitive advantage in a) small organizations, and b) large organizations? Is there a statistically significant difference in the relationship between learning orientation and competitive advantage among small organizations and large organizations? Does competitive advantage moderate the relationship between learning orientation and business performance in: a) small organizations, and b) large organizations? A survey based research methodology of middle to high-level executives and managers from a range of large and small firms in the United States is used to explore these research questions and pertinent findings reported in the light of previous study (Martinette, 2006). This study found that the relationship between sales and profits is statistically significant in both small and large organizations. Additionally, this study determined that the relationship between learning orientation and competitive advantage was statistically significant in both small and large organizations. Differences in business performance among large and small organizations were statistically significant with larger organizations reporting higher scores on business performance, however, there were no statistically significant differences in learning orientation and competitive advantage reported among large and small organizations. Lastly, investigation of the moderating effect of competitive advantage on learning orientation and business performance was not statistically significant among small or large organizations.



Keywords: Competitive advantage, learning orientation, business performance, shared vision/purpose, differentiation, market sensing.


Building Global Brand Equity through Advertising: Developing A Conceptual Framework Of Managing Global Brand Equity
Amit Arora

Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia
Mahesh Raisinghani
TWU School of Management, Texas Woman's University, Texas
Anshu Arora
College of Business Administration, Savannah State University, Savannah, Georgia
D. P. Kothari
Professor and Vice Chancellor, Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore, Tamilnadu, India

Abstract

The research paper addresses issues in global brand management and building global brand equity through advertising. In this paper, we focus on certain brand concepts like brand power, brand positioning, brand loyalty, and brand reinforcement in the context of 'Global Brand' and the ability of the global brand to command a premium price. We conceptualize "Brand Power" as a combination of brand awareness, brand knowledge, brand identity, brand promise, unique brand image, perceived quality, and brand vision in the context of Global Brand. We recognize that advertising creates global brand equity by living up to its brand power, with the use of a few case studies in the field of global brand equity management.
The research paper proposes a conceptual framework of global brand equity through our conceptualized global brand equity (GLOBEQ) model showing a direct relationship amongst brand equity drivers of brand power (brand awareness, brand knowledge, brand identity, brand promise, unique brand image, perceived quality, and brand vision), brand’s market position, brand loyalty, and brand reinforcement through brand associations and brand experiences. Marketers rely on advertising as a primary tool to develop and nurture brand equity. In this paper, we have used the DAGMAR approach in advertising for showing its impact on global brand equity. Global brand management issues have been discussed and a GLOBEQ model with inter-relationships with other key brand parameters has been suggested leading to an identification of factors for managing and enhancing global brand equity through advertising. The paper focuses on the following questions – 1) what characteristics do global brands have in common, 2) what actions can managers take to create and maintain global brands, and 3) how advertising acts as a contributor to global brand equity – specifically, how global brand equity measures can contribute to the development and evaluation of advertising.



Keywords: Global brand equity, Brand power, Brand positioning, Brand loyalty, Premium price and Advertising