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IJGMS (v4:n2)

Volume 4, Number 2

CONTENTS

Collectivist Cultural Values and Buyer-Supplier Relationships in the Middle East: The Jordanian Experience, Noor Al-Ma'aitah, Ebrahim Soltani and Ying Ying Liao
More Cheers for Conscious Capitalism: The Growth of Corporate Deontology, Breena E. Coates
The relationship between Supplier Quality Management and internal quality performance: The contingency effects of Supply Chain Orientation culture, Hamid Salimian, Ebrahim Soltani and Mona Rashidirad
Go Out 2.0: Identifying the Challenges Facing China's Internationalizing Enterprises, Francis Schortgen and John Saee
Information Technology and Resource Consumption: Causal Analysis of Paper Use, Vijay Vemuri and Emmanuel U. Opara

ABSTRACTS


Collectivist Cultural Values and Buyer-Supplier Relationships in the Middle East: The Jordanian Experience
Noor Al-Ma'aitah

University of Kent, Kent Business School, Canterbury, CT2 7PE, UK
+44(0)7564002469, Email: na256@kent.ac.uk

Professor Ebrahim Soltani

University of Kent, Kent Business School, Canterbury, CT2 7PE, UK
Email: E.Soltani@kent.ac.uk

Dr. Ying Ying Liao

Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, XJTLU Business School, China
Email: yingying.liao@xjtlu.edu.cn

Abstract

This research aims to examine Middle Eastern cultural norms and particular collectivist values and their resulting ramifications for long-term buyer-supplier relationships. In contrast to the existing Western-dominated research on the subject, a review of the extant literature indicates that there is insufficient evidence to shed light on the dynamics between cultural values and supplier-buyer relationships in non-Western organisational contexts. Using a quantitative survey methodology of a sample of Jordanian manufacturing firms, our results show that the Middle Eastern cultural values of ta'arof, wasta, and hifz ma'a wajh are essential in shaping the nature and quality of long-term buyer-supplier relationships. Given the under-researched context of this study, the research findings are expected to have useful implications for both academics and practicing managers.
Keywords: National Culture, Supply Chain Relationships, Quantitative Research, Middle East, Jordan.


More Cheers for Conscious Capitalism: The Growth of Corporate Deontology
Breena E. Coates, Ph.D.

Professor of Global Strategy, Department of Management
College of Business & Public Administration
California State University, San Bernardino
5500 University Pkwy, JB-461
San Bernardino, CA 92407
bcoates@csusb.edu

Abstract

Businesses in the 21st century have embraced the notion of "conscious capitalism" (CC) Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), & the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) and have translated those dicta into varying degrees of action, whereby the CC business paradigm is gaining momentum. Corporate deontology evidence affirms the notion that the private and public sectors, acknowledge by action, that the firm has broader stakeholder obligations than just shareholder profit and that these are utilitarian in nature. However skeptics still question CC as a real option for profit-maximizing corporations. This paper adds additional evidentiary muscle to the notion of corporate deontology by discussion of four important evidence streams that show how corporate obligations derive from: 1) Development of state laws to create "Benefit Corporations"; 2) Consumer preference and corporate response for CSR values; 3) Stock market indices of conscious capital stocks; and, 4) Institutional Values of academia that are changing how business students are being educated in the Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) that embrace conscious capitalism.



The relationship between Supplier Quality Management and internal quality performance: The contingency effects of Supply Chain Orientation culture
Hamid Salimian

PhD student, Kent Business School (KBS), University of Kent, UK
hs268@kent.ac.uk , 01227 827714

Ebrahim Soltani

Professor, Kent Business School (KBS), University of Kent, UK E.soltani@kent.ac.uk , 01227 824505

Mona Rashidirad

PhD student, Kent Business School (KBS), University of Kent, UK
mr339@kent.ac.uk , 01227 827714

Abstract

This study extends previous Supplier Quality Management (SQM) research by building a theoretical framework of the contingency effect of Supply Chain Orientation (SCO) culture on the relationship between three dimensions of SQM and two dimensions of internal quality performance. Based on contingency theory, we argue that there is a positive multidimensional relationship between SQM and internal quality performance, which is positively associated with high SCO culture. In fact, we believe that firms with strong SCO culture have more chanc e to increase their internal quality performance with regard to their supplier management processes. This paper contributes to 'Operations Management Practice Contingency Research' and attempts to raise the awareness of managers on their future strategic decisions regarding their suppliers.

Keywords: Supplier Quality Management (SQM), internal quality performance, SCO culture, contingency effect
Go Out 2.0: Identifying the Challenges Facing China's Internationalizing Enterprises
Francis Schortgen

University of Mount Union,
Alliance, OH, United States

John Saee

ESB Business School, Reutlingen University
Reutlingen, Germany

Abstract

The combination of evolving endogenous situational realities, a desire to establish a more visible global business presence commensurate with China's rapidly expanding geo-political and geo-economic clout, and the Chinese government's official "Go Out" policy have spurred a sustained commitment to an increasingly aggressive, diversified and omni-directional process of Chinese business internationalization. Building on the perception and framing dynamics surrounding their global expansion, this paper explores the prospects and challenges facing Chinese MNEs as they gradually transition from the 'springboard' phase to the 'expansion' phase ("Go Out 2.0") of internationalization. The conceptual novelty of the paper lies in advancing a multi-level contextual framework for identifying and classifying potentially critical hurdles facing China's internalizing MNEs, and advancing tentative propositions regarding possible ways to strengthen the prospects of China's expanding business internationalization in the 21st century.

Keywords:Chinese MNEs, Internationalization, Competitiveness, Liability of foreignness, Cultural, institutional, regulatory and normative distance.
Information Technology and Resource Consumption: Causal Analysis of Paper Use
Dr. Vijay Vemuri

Prairie View A&M University
Prairie View, TX 77446
vkvemuri@pvamu.com

Dr. Emmanuel U Opara

Prairie View A@M University
Prairie View Texas 88446
euopara@pvamu.edu

Abstract

High correlation between income and paper use, advances in information and communication technologies (ICT) providing credible alternatives to paper and the detrimental impact of paper production on the environment have drawn attention to the paper use. Many predict that in the near future, libraries, offices and even the entire society will eliminate the use of paper and become paperless. Ubiquity of computers, universal access to networks, and developments in enterprise systems, EDI, news and publishing industries give credence to reduced use of paper. However, the elimination of use of paper by the twentieth century did not happen, and it is doubtful if paper will vanish even a century after the original prediction. This paper develops a vector autoregression system consisting of gross domestic product, paper use for printing and writing, telecommunication revenues, and Internet users. Only one-way causal relations exist between these variables, and all of the remaining variables are Granger causal to paper use. Prior results establishing that GDP Granger causes teledensity are supported, and the conventional wisdom that the past number of Internet users can improve predictions (Granger causality) of telecom revenues is established. However, no evidence of rapid decline of paper use is observed.

Keywords: Paper Use; Granger Causality; ICT; Paperless Society.