Feedback
Name Email-Id Text

IJGMS (v5:n1)

Volume 5, Number 1

CONTENTS

Personality Type Preferences of Asian Managers: A Cross-Country Analysis Using the MBTI Instrument
Boonghee Yoo, James P. Neelankavil, Gloria M. de Guzman and Ricardo A. Lim
Beliefs in National Cultures: A Hybrid Model of Glocalization
Beryl Y. Chang
Examining Cross-Cultural HR Practices in Family Firms: Based on Three Taiwan Family Firms in Mainland China
Yujie Cai and Mingtian Yu
Can the Icelandic geothermal cluster contribute to a global transition to clean energy?..67
Hilmar por Hilmarsson


ABSTRACTS

Personality Type Preferences of Asian Managers : A Cross-Country Analysis Using the MBTI Instrument

Boonghee Yoo, Ph.D.

Professor of Marketing and International Business Zarb School of Business
Hofstra University Hempstead, NY 11549
E-Mail: Boonghee.yoo@hofstra.edu

James P. Neelankavil, Ph.D.
Robert E. Brockway Distinguished

Professor of Marketing and International Business
Zarb School of Business
Hofstra University Hempstead, NY 11549
E-Mail: mktjpn@hofstra.edu


Gloria M. de Guzman, Ph.D.

Professor of Management
Executive Education and Lifelong Learning Center
Asian Institute of Management
Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines
E-Mail: gmdeguzman@aim.edu

Ricardo A. Lim, Ph.D.

Dean, Asian Institute of Management
Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines
E-mail: ralim@aim.edu

Abstract

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a popular construct used to understand manager's cognitive and perceptual orientation. The current study attempts to add to the personality type literature by comparing managers in four Asian countries on the MBTI personality instrument to examine differences and similarities relative to type, country, and work satisfaction. The survey data of 1,405 managers show that, first, the overall dominant personality type preference of the four Asian country groups was extroversion, thinking, and judging. The thinking and judging preferences observed in this study are consistent with earlier research that found thinking and judging preferences among a majority of managers across a variety of cultures and types of organizations (Kirby, 1997). Second, data analysis noted cross-country differences in the managers' personality type preferences, indicating the mediating influence of culture and environment on natural, inborn preferences. Third, the managers' personality type varied according to country and demographic background. Finally, the managers' personality type preference affected satisfaction with the work through interaction with country background.

Keywords: Asian managers, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, NEO-Personal Inventory, personality assessment, human resource development, managerial training.


Beliefs in National Cultures: A Hybrid Model of Glocalization

Beryl Y. Chang, PhD

Associate Professor (Adj) Department of Economics School of Arts and Sciences Columbia
University
140 West 69th Street, 6th Fl New York, NY 10023 Phone: 212.799.1799 beryl@cb-advisors.org
beryl.chang@columbia.edu

Abstract

This article posits that distinctive national cultures between the East and the West defined by Hofstede are manifestations of differed but correlated worldviews that shape economic development and control systems. Data confirm that Western influenced nations pursue a belief of human will to conquer with scientific and rational-based reasoning and Eastern influenced nations trail the cosmogony tradition to concur with innate surroundings in pursuit of social order. Further, given the limitations of views on both worlds, the paper proposes a hybrid 'glocalization' model with the West as global and the East as local case using financial industry as an illustration.



Keywords: Glocalization, National Culture, Cultural Dimensions, Hybridization, Financial Market Management

Examining Cross-Cultural HR Practices in Family Firms:

Based on Three Taiwan Family Firms in Mainland China

Yujie Cai, Ph. D.
Mingtian Yu, Ph. D.

University of Liverpool Management School
Chatham Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZH, UK
ycai@liverpool.ac.uk

Abstract

This paper examines the human resource practices and their implementation in three small-sized family firms, which originated from Taiwan and are currently operating in Shanghai, Mainland China. Based on semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation, we examined the role of human resources (HR) practices in business operation processes. These HR practices include recruiting and selection, training, performance appraisal, compensation, employee involvement, and CEO succession. Specifically, we investigated the difference between family employees and nonfamily employees in the implementation of these HR practices.

Can the Icelandic geothermal cluster contribute to a global transition to clean energy?
Hilmar Por Hilmarsson, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Akureyri
Visiting Scholar, University of Washington
Solborg, Norurslod 600 Akureyri, Iceland
Tel +354 849 8380 Fax +354 460 8999 hilmar@unak.is
6155 NE Radford Drive #1022
Seattle, WA 98115, USA
Tel +1 206 321 5962
hilmarh@uw.edu

Abstract

Iceland is small country in Europe that has received international attention for its use of geothermal energy for space heating and electricity production. During the transition from fossil fuel to geothermal energy, know-how has accumulated and a number of companies and institutions have proven capabilities in, for example, exploration of geothermal sites, drilling as well as in constructing, operating and maintenance of geothermal power plants. The purpose of this article is to analyse and assess the potential of an Icelandic geothermal exporting cluster engaging internationally. The focus is on cross border activities of an organized exporting cluster engaging in the provision of consultant and advisory services, construction, operators and maintenance of geothermal power plants, as well as sponsors and shareholders in geothermal projects. The objective is to answer the question in the Icelandic geothermal cluster contribute to a global transition to clean energy? A successful engagement globally would mean that Icelandic companies could profit from their cross border operations and at the same time partners in emerging economies could benefit from this partnership. Given the higher risk profile in emerging market countries the article will also discuss the participation of global, regional as well as national financial institutions as sources of funding and risk mitigation for geothermal projects.

Keywords: Geothermal cluster, Iceland, emerging markets, cross-border trade and investment, funding and risk mitigation instruments.